OUR MISSION

Our mission is to train, advise, and assist rangers worldwide in the fight against the illegal wildlife trade by deploying new techniques and technologies to maximise their impact on the ground.

We want to ensure that endangered species have a place on our planet. We help wildlife conservation by providing anti poaching ranger training.

THE PROBLEM

“The illegal wildlife trade is the fourth most lucrative transnational crime worldwide after guns, drugs, and human trafficking, and is estimated to be worth as much as

$23 billion a year in ivory, horns, scales, fins and hide.”

There is no single solution to the multitude of problems caused by the illegal wildlife trade, and the scale of the issues means there is always more work needed to combat them; so, illegal trade flourishes.

The ultimate result of this criminal industry is the extinction of species – which has reached an unprecedented  level this decade – and the degradation of our planet, both ecologically, and in terms of biodiversity. The wildlife rangers assigned to protect the world’s most endangered species are tasked with guarding colossal areas of land against poachers, ranging from the vast plains of Africa to the dense jungles of Southeast Asia.  More often than not, these courageous men and women have no choice but to defend our last precious resources with rudimentary equipment and anti poaching ranger training.

In recent years, we have experienced an unprecedented spike in the sale of illegal wildlife, which has been directly responsible for placing over 130 indigenous Southeast Asian species on the critically endangered list, including elephants, pangolins, sea turtles, and rhinos. These species are hunted and killed for a variety of reasons, and the diverse demand and usage only adds to the overall problem.

THE PROBLEM

The illegal wildlife trade is the fourth most lucrative transnational crime worldwide after guns, drugs, and human trafficking, and is estimated to be worth as much as

$23 billion a year in ivory, horns, scales, fins and hide.

There is no single solution to the multitude of problems caused by the trade, and the scale of the issues means there is always more work needed to combat them; so, illegal trade flourishes. The ultimate result of this criminal industry is the extinction of species – which has reached an unprecedented  level this decade – and the degradation of our planet, both ecologically, and in terms of biodiversity.

The wildlife rangers assigned to protect the world’s most endangered species are tasked with guarding colossal areas of land against poachers, ranging from the vast plains of Africa to the dense jungles of Southeast Asia.  More often than not, these courageous men and women have no choice but to defend our last precious resources with rudimentary equipment and training.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

In recent years, we have experienced an unprecedented spike in the sale of illegal wildlife, which has been directly responsible for placing over 130 indigenous Southeast Asian species on the critically endangered list, including elephants, pangolins, sea turtles, and rhinos. These species are hunted and killed for a variety of reasons, and the diverse demand and usage only adds to the overall problem.

THE PROBLEM

“”The illegal wildlife trade is the fourth most lucrative transnational crime worldwide after guns, drugs, and human trafficking, and is estimated to be worth as much as

$23 billion a year in ivory, horns, scales, fins and hide.”

There is no single solution to the multitude of problems caused by the trade, and the scale of the issues means there is always more work needed to combat them; so, illegal trade flourishes. The ultimate result of this criminal industry is the extinction of species – which has reached an unprecedented  level this decade – and the degradation of our planet, both ecologically, and in terms of biodiversity.

The wildlife rangers assigned to protect the world’s most endangered species are tasked with guarding colossal areas of land against poachers, ranging from the vast plains of Africa to the dense jungles of Southeast Asia.  More often than not, these courageous men and women have no choice but to defend our last precious resources with rudimentary equipment and training.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

In recent years, we have experienced an unprecedented spike in the sale of illegal wildlife, which has been directly responsible for placing over 130 indigenous Southeast Asian species on the critically endangered list, including elephants, pangolins, sea turtles, and rhinos. These species are hunted and killed for a variety of reasons, and the diverse demand and usage only adds to the overall problem.

To succeed in our mission to combat the illegal wildlife trade, it’s crucial that we approach the problem from a number of angles. Our work focuses on three key areas which we believe are critical in tackling the mounting issues our planet’s critically endangered species face.

Click on one of the images below to find out more.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

TRAINING

We’re providing anti poaching ranger training with the essential skills and equipment they need to operate safely and effectively on the frontlines of wildlife conservation.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

TECHNOLOGY

We’re working to bring wildlife conservation into the 21st century by sourcing, researching, and developing the modern tools needed to effectively counter the illegal wildlife trade.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

PARTNERSHIPS

We’re forging stronger relationships across the field of wildlife conservation, with the aim of building a network powerful enough to protect our planet’s most vulnerable species and ecosystems.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

TRAINING

We’re providing rangers with the essential skills and equipment they need to operate safely and effectively on the frontlines of wildlife conservation.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

TECHNOLOGY

We’re working to bring conservation into the 21st century by sourcing, researching, and developing the modern tools needed to effectively counter the illegal wildlife trade.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

PARTNERSHIPS

We’re forging stronger relationships across the field of conservation, with the aim of building a network powerful enough to protect our planet’s most vulnerable species and ecosystems.

We’re aiming to save the most endangered species on the planet from being hunted to extinction through the illegal wildlife trade

Click on one of the images below to find out more.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response
wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

OUR STORY

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

Kevin Garrad

President & Founder

Kevin Garrad is an international anti-poaching consultant and founder of Wild Response.

Born and raised in London, England, Kevin moved to the USA where he obtained citizenship and joined the US Army. After serving 8 tours of duty over 16 years, including 8 years as a Green Beret in the US Special Forces, Kevin retired due to his combat injuries and decided to devote his time to his greatest passion; wildlife conservation.

In 2016, with almost two decades of experience training foreign and indigenous personnel in the world’s most dangerous and remote locations, Kevin began training rangers on the frontlines of conservation in Africa.  He began as a team leader for a globally-recognised NPO, eventually moving on to become the head anti-poaching instructor for one of Africa’s premier ranger academies.

Kevin’s goal is to prevent endangered species from being killed and sold as part of the illegal wildlife trade, by providing training and resources to rangers in critical locations around the world. He hopes to partner with governments, non-profits, and private entities in order to provide the most effective equipment and informed training methods for those in harm’s way.

Kevin currently resides in Thailand, where he assists local non-profits and wildlife rangers in protecting endangered species.

Jeff Mazziotta is a specialist in effective field training.

Born in Houston, Texas, Jeff served in Iraq with the U.S. Army as a Combat Engineer. After finishing his service, Jeff went on to become a technical trainer and later program coordinator; conducting, and overseeing landmine familiarization and clearance training courses for the U.S. Army.

Wanting to amplify his impact, Jeff transitioned from the military world to the non-profit sector, becoming a Technical Field Manager for Mines Advisory Group. Working in Angola, Jeff was in charge of field operations of around 100 local staff in Lucusse, Moxico Province; including three clearance teams, a rapid response EOD (explosive ordnance disposal) team, and support staff including medics, drivers, and other personnel.  During this time, he was able to empower local staff, working together to successfully clear hundreds of thousands of square meters to turn dangerous minefields into safe usable land for people and animal use.

Jeff graduated from Temple University with a degree in Political Science, and a focus on Foreign Policy analysis. He has presented on US foreign policy decisions at global academic conferences and continues to research how weapons proliferation affects conservation areas and impacts the lives of people in post conflict nations.  Jeff’s goal is to empower local communities to make positive changes in their lives, whether it is through clearing remnants of war that impact both human and animal lives, providing high level training for rangers, or pushing for sustainable conservation policy on a national level.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

Jeff Mazziotta

Director

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

Kimberly Wood 

Director

Kimberly is an international wildlife field research photographer and videographer based on Oahu, Hawai’i.  

Kimberley’s passion for conservation photography began as a child growing up in the mountains of Colorado, where she was mesmerised by the local butterfly population and its habitat usage.  Subsequently, she attended and graduated from the University of Hawai’i, and now spends part of her year in the Hawaiian Islands collaborating with two different research groups – one focusing on pelagic dolphin and whale stocks, and the other studying whale shark population distribution. The rest of the year is spent working internationally with conservation groups in countries such as Mozambique, Sri Lanka and South Africa where, in addition to her photography work, she strives to educate the next generation about conservation, and studies the ways conservation issues are handled from the perspectives of different cultures.

Kimberly’s main focus with her work and photography is to grow and strengthen the web of conservation worldwide.

OUR STORY

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

Kevin Garrad

President & Founder

Kevin Garrad is an international anti-poaching consultant and founder of Wild Response.

Born and raised in London, England, Kevin moved to the USA where he obtained citizenship and joined the US Army. After serving 8 tours of duty over 16 years, including 8 years as a Green Beret in the US Special Forces, Kevin retired due to his combat injuries and decided to devote his time to his greatest passion; wildlife conservation.

In 2016, with almost two decades of experience training foreign and indigenous personnel in the world’s most dangerous and remote locations, Kevin began training rangers on the frontlines of conservation in Africa.  He began as a team leader for a globally-recognised NPO, eventually moving on to become the head anti-poaching instructor for one of Africa’s premier ranger academies.

Kevin’s goal is to prevent endangered species from being killed and sold as part of the illegal wildlife trade, by providing training and resources to rangers in critical locations around the world. He hopes to partner with governments, non-profits, and private entities in order to provide the most effective equipment and informed training methods for those in harm’s way.

Kevin currently resides in Thailand, where he assists local non-profits and wildlife rangers in protecting endangered species.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

Jeff Mazziotta

Director

Jeff Mazziotta is a specialist in effective field training.

Born in Houston, Texas, Jeff served in Iraq with the U.S. Army as a Combat Engineer. After finishing his service, Jeff went on to become a technical trainer and later program coordinator; conducting, and overseeing landmine familiarization and clearance training courses for the U.S. Army.

Wanting to amplify his impact, Jeff transitioned from the military world to the non-profit sector, becoming a Technical Field Manager for Mines Advisory Group. Working in Angola, Jeff was in charge of field operations of around 100 local staff in Lucusse, Moxico Province; including three clearance teams, a rapid response EOD (explosive ordnance disposal) team, and support staff including medics, drivers, and other personnel.  During this time, he was able to empower local staff, working together to successfully clear hundreds of thousands of square meters to turn dangerous minefields into safe usable land for people and animal use.

Jeff graduated from Temple University with a degree in Political Science, and a focus on Foreign Policy analysis. He has presented on US foreign policy decisions at global academic conferences and continues to research how weapons proliferation affects conservation areas and impacts the lives of people in post conflict nations.  Jeff’s goal is to empower local communities to make positive changes in their lives, whether it is through clearing remnants of war that impact both human and animal lives, providing high level training for rangers, or pushing for sustainable conservation policy on a national level.

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

Kimberly Wood

Director

Kimberly is an international wildlife field research photographer and videographer based on Oahu, Hawai’i. 

Kimberley’s passion for conservation photography began as a child growing up in the mountains of Colorado, where she was mesmerised by the local butterfly population and its habitat usage.  Subsequently, she attended and graduated from the University of Hawai’i, and now spends part of her year in the Hawaiian Islands collaborating with two different research groups – one focusing on pelagic dolphin and whale stocks, and the other studying whale shark population distribution. The rest of the year is spent working internationally with conservation groups in countries such as Mozambique, Sri Lanka and South Africa where, in addition to her photography work, she strives to educate the next generation about conservation, and studies the ways conservation issues are handled from the perspectives of different cultures.

Kimberly’s main focus with her work and photography is to grow and strengthen the web of conservation worldwide.

 CONTACT US

Together, we have a chance to save our wildlife from extinction, so let’s start a conversation.

4 + 2 =

wildlife conservation, Home, Wild Response

Wild Response is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt, non-profit organization registered in Massachusetts, United States. All donations made to Wild Response are tax deductible to the extent provided by law.

Wild Response's E.I.N. (Employer Identification Number/Federal Tax Identification Number) is 83-3753390