THE WORK

To succeed in our mission to combat the illegal wildlife trade, it’s crucial that we approach the problem from a number of angles. Our work focuses on three key areas which we believe are critical in tackling the mounting issues our planet’s critically endangered species face.

To succeed in our mission to combat the illegal wildlife trade, it’s crucial that we approach the problem from a number of angles. Our work focuses on three key areas which we believe are critical in tackling the mounting issues our planet’s critically endangered species face.

TRAINING

“Park rangers are on the frontline of wildlife conservation every day and, more often than not, find themselves under trained and under equipped to protect species from poachers.”

The areas that rangers are charged with protecting are vast, remote and difficult to access, and it’s imperative that these men and women have the skills and tools required to defend themselves and the animals from harm.

Using our wealth of experience from the military, conservation, and working with anti-poaching organisations across the African continent, we aim to implement methods that have been tried and tested by governments, NGOs, and law enforcement agencies across the globe to train, advise, and assist rangers in the field. Wild Response implements a structured approach to save both time and resources.  Initially, we run a Basic course that guarantees the rangers are fully trained in field survival and medical techniques, as well as man-tracking and shooting – organisations across the world teach their cadets these skills at a base-level so they can survive life-threatening situations, and this is no different on the frontlines of wildlife conservation.

Once a ranger has successfully completed the Basic anti-poaching ranger training course, they can progress to the Advanced stage, where they learn in-depth ranger tactics and further medical skills, as well as learning advanced off-road driving techniques; however, these field skills are not the only abilities needed to dismantle the illegal wildlife trade effectively.  Whilst catching a poacher may be viewed as a successful operation, the whole exercise is useless without being able to conclusively implicate them in the crime.

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This is why we also focus on the legal processes; training rangers in crime scene investigation and interrogation techniques, evidence collection, and forensic photography as well as the rule of law and police hand-off procedures, in order to increase the currently poor rate of prosecution.

The best way to cement our understanding of essential concepts is to teach them to others which is why, once a ranger has successfully graduated from our Advanced course, they are eligible to attend our Train The Trainer course to give them the skills required to pass on their knowledge to others.  Not only does this ensure the rangers are confident in everything they’ve learned so far, but it means that in the future they can continue to train themselves with minimal input from us, so we can refocus our efforts on untrained rangers and expand our efforts. Finally, to make sure a lack of equipment doesn’t undermine our hard work, we aim to provide all of our course graduates with new uniforms and field gear so they can fulfill their duties as effectively as possible.

Modern technology is advancing at a rapid pace with no signs of slowing down, and we firmly believe that the ability to implement the latest tools is one of our most effective weapons in the battle against the illegal wildlife trade.

The criminals we’re trying to stop have access to much of the same hardware and software as we do; however, in the majority of cases, they have much more capital to invest in the latest technology, which puts them more than a few steps ahead of us.  While we may not be able to cut off their access to tech, we can do our best to make sure that wildlife rangers are at least as well equipped as the poachers they’re facing to give them the best chance at protecting our irreplaceable species.

Our objective is to provide rangers with low-cost, durable equipment that’s easy to master – to even the playing field and increase their ability to defend our most endangered species. Along with GPS, remote game cameras can be used to cover vast areas, instantly notifying rangers with live images whenever something passes, be it an animal or an intruder. Drones are more popular than ever, but some are more effective than others, and with the right models and training, rangers can track poachers safely from the air and coordinate a successful interception. 

Read More

While this technology can make a massive difference in the field, it’s essential to realise the broader impact of tech in the illegal wildlife industry – the trade itself is facilitated through online marketplaces, and bringing down an entire network may rely on prosecutors having a thorough understanding of these systems, so training comes in to play again.  In addition to helping us bring down criminals, new technology gives us the means to monitor our work on the ground carefully, ultimately providing accountability to rangers and governments. While part of our mission is to get modern gear into the hands of teams in the field, we also aim to raise awareness of our cause in the technology industry itself. By reaching out to companies and corporations to field-test cutting-edge hardware and software, and forging stronger ties between wildlife conservation and technology organisations, we can modernise anti-poaching procedures for this generation.

TECHNOLOGY

“The areas that rangers have to protect can be vast, and without functioning GPS and satellite technology, it can be impossible to monitor events in real-time to catch poachers in the act.”

PARTNERSHIPS

“Eradicating the illegal wildlife trade is a monumental challenge and not one that any organisation can tackle alone.”

Unfortunately, an old-school mentality still exists when it comes to NPOs working together – groups simply don’t talk to each other and, in some cases, will even act as if they’re in direct competition.

This is counter-intuitive and hugely detrimental to the cause which all of these groups share, but it persists nevertheless.  We want to eliminate this archaic way of thinking because we understand the benefits that come from cooperation and the exchange of resources and information. NPOs already have their work cut out for them and we want to bridge the gaps between organisations to become the connector that helps the conversation, putting the right people in touch with each other and facilitating partnerships that increase everyone’s ability to effectively protect species at risk of extinction.

Banding together is also hugely beneficial when it comes to raising funding and applying for grants, and by promoting inter-NPO cooperation, we aim to warm people up to a new way of working and build their trust in a new, more successful system.  Our goal of forging strong partnerships isn’t restricted to other NPOs – we want to work closely with governments across the globe, as well as for-profit organisations and technology companies, because we believe it’s crucial to gain as many fresh perspectives as possible while making the most of every resource available to us.

Read More

We’re more than willing to volunteer our training services to other organisations, to field test new equipment, and to R&D innovative tech if it helps further our collective goal of destroying the illegal trade in wildlife that threatens our planet’s species. We also aim to create deep bonds with local communities so we can raise awareness in the regions in which wildlife is trafficked – if we can educate the people who live in the communities most affected by the criminality of the trade, we will have more people on our side in the fight to bring it down.

 

TRAINING

“Park rangers are on the frontline of wildlife conservation every day and, more often than not, find themselves under trained and under equipped to protect species from poachers.”

The areas that rangers are charged with protecting are vast, remote and difficult to access, and it’s imperative that these men and women have the skills and tools required to defend themselves and the animals from harm.

Using our wealth of experience from the military, conservation, and working with anti-poaching organisations across the African continent, we aim to implement methods that have been tried and tested by governments, NGOs, and law enforcement agencies across the globe to train, advise, and assist rangers in the field. Wild Response implements a structured approach to save both time and resources.  Initially, we run a Basic course that guarantees the rangers are fully trained in field survival and medical techniques, as well as man-tracking and shooting – organisations across the world teach their cadets these skills at a base-level so they can survive life-threatening situations, and this is no different on the frontlines of wildlife conservation.

Read More

Once a ranger has successfully completed the Basic training course, they can progress to the Advanced stage, where they learn in-depth ranger tactics and further medical skills, as well as learning advanced off-road driving techniques; however, these field skills are not the only abilities needed to dismantle the illegal wildlife trade effectively.  Whilst catching a poacher may be viewed as a successful operation, the whole exercise is useless without being able to conclusively implicate them in the crime. This is why we also focus on the legal processes; training rangers in crime scene investigation and interrogation techniques, evidence collection, and forensic photography as well as the rule of law and police hand-off procedures, in order to increase the currently poor rate of prosecution.

The best way to cement our understanding of essential concepts is to teach them to others which is why, once a ranger has successfully graduated from our Advanced course, they are eligible to attend our Train The Trainer course to give them the skills required to pass on their knowledge to others.  Not only does this ensure the rangers are confident in everything they’ve learned so far, but it means that in the future they can continue to train themselves with minimal input from us, so we can refocus our efforts on untrained rangers and expand our efforts. Finally, to make sure a lack of equipment doesn’t undermine our hard work, we aim to provide all of our course graduates with new uniforms and field gear so they can fulfill their duties as effectively as possible.

Read More

Once a ranger has successfully completed the Basic training course, they can progress to the Advanced stage, where they learn in-depth ranger tactics and further medical skills, as well as learning advanced off-road driving techniques; however, these field skills are not the only abilities needed to dismantle the illegal wildlife trade effectively.  Whilst catching a poacher may be viewed as a successful operation, the whole exercise is useless without being able to conclusively implicate them in the crime. This is why we also focus on the legal processes; training rangers in crime scene investigation and interrogation techniques, evidence collection, and forensic photography as well as the rule of law and police hand-off procedures, in order to increase the currently poor rate of prosecution.

The best way to cement our understanding of essential concepts is to teach them to others which is why, once a ranger has successfully graduated from our Advanced course, they are eligible to attend our Train The Trainer course to give them the skills required to pass on their knowledge to others.  Not only does this ensure the rangers are confident in everything they’ve learned so far, but it means that in the future they can continue to train themselves with minimal input from us, so we can refocus our efforts on untrained rangers and expand our efforts. Finally, to make sure a lack of equipment doesn’t undermine our hard work, we aim to provide all of our course graduates with new uniforms and field gear so they can fulfill their duties as effectively as possible.

TECHNOLOGY

The areas that rangers have to protect can be vast, and without functioning GPS and satellite technology, it can be impossible to monitor events in real-time to catch poachers in the act.

Modern technology is advancing at a rapid pace with no signs of slowing down, and we firmly believe that the ability to implement the latest tools is one of our most effective weapons in the battle against the illegal wildlife trade.

The criminals we’re trying to stop have access to much of the same hardware and software as we do; however, in the majority of cases, they have much more capital to invest in the latest technology, which puts them more than a few steps ahead of us.  While we may not be able to cut off their access to tech, we can do our best to make sure that wildlife rangers are at least as well equipped as the poachers they’re facing to give them the best chance at protecting our irreplaceable species.

Read More

 

Our objective is to provide rangers with low-cost, durable equipment that’s easy to master – to even the playing field and increase their ability to defend our most endangered species. Along with GPS, remote game cameras can be used to cover vast areas, instantly notifying rangers with live images whenever something passes, be it an animal or an intruder. Drones are more popular than ever, but some are more effective than others, and with the right models and training, rangers can track poachers safely from the air and coordinate a successful interception.  

While this technology can make a massive difference in the field, it’s essential to realise the broader impact of tech in the illegal wildlife industry – the trade itself is facilitated through online marketplaces, and bringing down an entire network may rely on prosecutors having a thorough understanding of these systems, so training comes in to play again.  In addition to helping us bring down criminals, new technology gives us the means to monitor our work on the ground carefully, ultimately providing accountability to rangers and governments. While part of our mission is to get modern gear into the hands of teams in the field, we also aim to raise awareness of our cause in the technology industry itself. By reaching out to companies and corporations to field-test cutting-edge hardware and software, and forging stronger ties between wildlife conservation and technology organisations, we can modernise anti-poaching procedures for this generation.

y graduated from our Advanced course, they are eligible to attend our Train The Trainer course to give them the skills required to pass on their knowledge to others.  Not only does this ensure the rangers are confident in everything they’ve learned so far, but it means that in the future they can continue to train themselves with minimal input from us, so we can refocus our efforts on untrained rangers and expand our efforts. Finally, to make sure a lack of equipment doesn’t undermine our hard work, we aim to provide all of our course graduates with new uniforms and field gear so they can fulfill their duties as effectively as possible.

Read More

Once a ranger has successfully completed the Basic training course, they can progress to the Advanced stage, where they learn in-depth ranger tactics and further medical skills, as well as learning advanced off-road driving techniques; however, these field skills are not the only abilities needed to dismantle the illegal wildlife trade effectively.  Whilst catching a poacher may be viewed as a successful operation, the whole exercise is useless without being able to conclusively implicate them in the crime. This is why we also focus on the legal processes; training rangers in crime scene investigation and interrogation techniques, evidence collection, and forensic photography as well as the rule of law and police hand-off procedures, in order to increase the currently poor rate of prosecution.

The best way to cement our understanding of essential concepts is to teach them to others which is why, once a ranger has successfully graduated from our Advanced course, they are eligible to attend our Train The Trainer course to give them the skills required to pass on their knowledge to others.  Not only does this ensure the rangers are confident in everything they’ve learned so far, but it means that in the future they can continue to train themselves with minimal input from us, so we can refocus our efforts on untrained rangers and expand our efforts. Finally, to make sure a lack of equipment doesn’t undermine our hard work, we aim to provide all of our course graduates with new uniforms and field gear so they can fulfill their duties as effectively as possible.

PARTNERSHIPS

“Eradicating the illegal wildlife trade is a monumental challenge and not one that any organisation can tackle alone.”

Unfortunately, an old-school mentality still exists when it comes to NPOs working together – groups simply don’t talk to each other and, in some cases, will even act as if they’re in direct competition.

This is counter-intuitive and hugely detrimental to the cause which all of these groups share, but it persists nevertheless.  We want to eliminate this archaic way of thinking because we understand the benefits that come from cooperation and the exchange of resources and information. NPOs already have their work cut out for them and we want to bridge the gaps between organisations to become the connector that helps the conversation, putting the right people in touch with each other and facilitating partnerships that increase everyone’s ability to effectively protect species at risk of extinction.

Read More

Banding together is also hugely beneficial when it comes to raising funding and applying for grants, and by promoting inter-NPO cooperation, we aim to warm people up to a new way of working and build their trust in a new, more successful system. Our goal of forging strong partnerships isn’t restricted to other NPOs – we want to work closely with governments across the globe, as well as for-profit organisations and technology companies, because we believe it’s crucial to gain as many fresh perspectives as possible while making the most of every resource available to us. We’re more than willing to volunteer our training services to other organisations, to field test new equipment, and to R&D innovative tech if it helps further our collective goal of destroying the illegal trade in wildlife that threatens our planet’s species.  

We also aim to create deep bonds with local communities so we can raise awareness in the regions in which wildlife is trafficked – if we can educate the people who live in the communities most affected by the criminality of the trade, we will have more people on our side in the fight to bring it down.

Read More

Once a ranger has successfully completed the Basic training course, they can progress to the Advanced stage, where they learn in-depth ranger tactics and further medical skills, as well as learning advanced off-road driving techniques; however, these field skills are not the only abilities needed to dismantle the illegal wildlife trade effectively.  Whilst catching a poacher may be viewed as a successful operation, the whole exercise is useless without being able to conclusively implicate them in the crime. This is why we also focus on the legal processes; training rangers in crime scene investigation and interrogation techniques, evidence collection, and forensic photography as well as the rule of law and police hand-off procedures, in order to increase the currently poor rate of prosecution.

The best way to cement our understanding of essential concepts is to teach them to others which is why, once a ranger has successfully graduated from our Advanced course, they are eligible to attend our Train The Trainer course to give them the skills required to pass on their knowledge to others.  Not only does this ensure the rangers are confident in everything they’ve learned so far, but it means that in the future they can continue to train themselves with minimal input from us, so we can refocus our efforts on untrained rangers and expand our efforts. Finally, to make sure a lack of equipment doesn’t undermine our hard work, we aim to provide all of our course graduates with new uniforms and field gear so they can fulfill their duties as effectively as possible.

 CONTACT US

Together, we have a chance to save our wildlife from extinction, so let’s start a conversation.

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